Art Pottery Roadshow – Bring up to two pieces of your NC pottery

Bring Up to Two Pieces of Your North Carolina Pottery!

ART POTTERY ROADSHOW AT MUSEUM

RALEIGH, NC June 12, 2014 – Bring up to two pieces of your North Carolina pottery and learn more about them from experts! Three authorities on the art pottery movement in North Carolina — A. Everette James, Charles G. (Terry) Zug and Steve Compton — will present Art Pottery Roadshow on Saturday, June 21, at 1 p.m. at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh.  Hear them talk about the state’s art pottery movement. Learn how different potters’ styles have changed and evolved through the years.

In the early 1900s, Tar Heel potters began using innovative colorful glazes and reinterpreted traditional shapes to transform their vessels into decorative items to sell. These objects and more appear in the exhibit Formed, Fired and Finished: Art Pottery from the James-Farmer Collection at the N.C. Museum of History. Photo: N.C. Museum of History

In the early 1900s, Tar Heel potters began using innovative colorful glazes and reinterpreted traditional shapes to transform their vessels into decorative items to sell. These objects and more appear in the exhibit Formed, Fired and Finished: Art Pottery from the James-Farmer Collection at the N.C. Museum of History.
Photo: N.C. Museum of History

After the talk, they will identify your North Carolina pottery and tell you more about it. Don’t miss this rare opportunity! The program is FREE. (No monetary appraisals will be given.)

About the Art Pottery Experts

  • Terry Zug is professor emeritus of folklore and English at UNC-Chapel Hill. He is author of Turners and Burners: The Folk Potters of North Carolina, Five North Carolina Folk Artists and The Traditional Pottery of North Carolina. Zug coedits Arts in Earnest: North Carolina Folklife.
  • A. Everette Jamesis a dedicated historian and philanthropist who has published more than 20 books and 500 articles. His book, North Carolina Art Pottery, 1900-1960, inspired the exhibit Formed, Fired and Finished: Art Pottery from the James-Farmer Collection, currently on view at the N.C. Museum of History.The exhibit featuresover 70 items by North Carolina potters. The pottery is on loan from James and his wife, Nancy Jane Farmer.
  • Steve Compton is the author of North Carolina Pottery: Earthenware, Stoneware, and Fancyware: Identification and Values and Seagrove Potteries Through Time.

Come meet these three experts and discover something new about North Carolina pottery!

For information about the N.C. Museum of History, a Smithsonian-affiliated museum, call 919-807-7900 or access www.ncmuseumofhistory.org or follow on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ or YouTube.

 

About the N.C. Museum of History
The N.C. Museum of History is located at 5 E. Edenton Street in downtown Raleigh. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. The museum collects and preserves artifacts of North Carolina history and educates the public on the history of the state and the nation through exhibits and educational programs. Each year more than 300,000 people visit the museum to see some of the 150,000 artifacts in the museum collection. The Museum of History, within the Division of State History Museums, is part of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

About the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources
The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources (NCDCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s cultural resources to build the social, cultural and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan W. Kluttz, NCDCR’s mission to enrich lives and communities creates opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history and libraries in North Carolina that will spark creativity, stimulate learning, preserve the state’s history and promote the creative economy. NCDCR was the first state organization in the nation to include all agencies for arts and culture under one umbrella.

Through arts efforts led by the N.C. Arts Council, the N.C. Symphony and the N.C. Museum of Art, NCDCR offers the opportunity for enriching arts education for young and old alike and economic stimulus engines for our state’s communities. NCDCR’s Divisions of Archives and Records, State Historic Sites, and State History Museums preserve, document and interpret North Carolina’s rich cultural heritage. NCDCR’s State Library of North Carolina is the principal library of state government and builds the capacity of all libraries in our state, developing and supporting access to traditional and online collections such as genealogy and resources for the blind and physically handicapped.

NCDCR annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported symphony orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council and the State Archives of North Carolina. NCDCR champions our state’s creative industry that accounts for more than 300,000 jobs and generates nearly $18.5 billion in revenues. For more information, please call 919-807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

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Michael "Beach Mick" Hudson

About the Author:

Michael "Beach Mick" Hudson is the founder and Editor of Beach Carolina Magazine. Living along the coast of North Carolina, Mike has a passion for the beach and loves to bring news and events of the Carolinas to others around the world.

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