Introducing the New Albert J. Ellis Police Chief: Renado Prince

JACKSONVILLE, NC July 18, 2014 – Renado Prince, the new Albert J. Ellis police chief, packs more than thirty years of experience into a career that brought him to Onslow County.  Prince was sworn in yesterday by Onslow County Clerk of Court Bettie Gurganus at the Onslow County Courthouse with nearly 30 family, co-workers and friends in attendance.

Prince signs the beam that was placed atop the new Albert J. Ellis passenger terminal July 10.

Prince signs the beam that was placed atop the new Albert J. Ellis passenger terminal July 10.

The Bolivia, NC native seems perfect for his new position leading a full-service police force here. Prince’s military career, which began on active duty in 1981 and concluded in 2004 as a reservist, will endear him to many Onslow County residents and allows him to relate to the challenges of a military-based community.  His subsequent law enforcement achievements similarly separated him from the crowd of applicants who sought to take on the mantle of police chief.

Renado Prince is sworn in as the new police chief for Onslow County’s Albert J. Ellis Airport July 17 by Onslow County Clerk of Court Bettie Gurganus at the Onslow County Courthouse with his mother and wife.

Renado Prince is sworn in as the new police chief for Onslow County’s Albert J. Ellis Airport July 17 by Onslow County Clerk of Court Bettie Gurganus at the Onslow County Courthouse with his mother and wife.

Born in Baltimore but raised near Shallotte, N.C. Prince joined the U.S. Air Force after high school and served with security forces performing law enforcement duties.  He started as a law enforcement specialist and through assignments at Clark Air Base in the Philippines, Malmstrom AFB, Montana, Clear Air Force Station, Alaska, Moody AFB, Georgia and Seymour Johnson AFB in Goldsboro Prince has filled nearly every law enforcement role in the military.  He concluded his career as the superintendent of investigation (equivalent to criminal investigative division) at Seymour Johnson.

While a reservist the new chief began serving with the Wilmington Police Department.  Again he worked his way up as a patrolman and a crime scene investigator before he was promoted to lieutenant after only five years.  As a lieutenant he was the director of the special operations division, the criminal investigation division and director of patrol services, including K-9, boat unit and air operations.

“What I’ve done since age 18 I think has prepared me for the position of OAJ chief, especially considering my Air Force time working with air operations, safeguarding aircraft and maintaining restricted areas.  I am blessed to have the experiences I’ve had,” Prince said.

Prince is not quick to mention his extensive training.  He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, which trains law enforcement executives from around the world.  There were more than 200 student representing 26 countries in his class.  Considering that the state is allotted only 13 slots per year, Prince’s selection to attend was an honor in itself.

While in Wilmington he gained more responsibility as Prince’s career progressed.  At one time he was the patrol services division commander for two city districts.  His 14.5 square-mile area of responsibility included 52 officers serving 35,000 citizens.  In other cities his area would be a precinct. Prince also completed the North Carolina State Administrative Officer Management Program while with Wilmington P.D.

He explained, “The military teaches us to seek greater responsibility as we progress.  Naturally I sought to continue to move up, however there must be an opening.  Unfortunately there were not many slots to
which I could be promoted. When I saw the opening for a chief position at Albert J. Ellis, it just seemed like a natural progression, so I applied.  I am here by the grace of God.” Prince has formed his own leadership philosophy based on what he learned from those with whom he’s served; both senior and subordinate.

“Sergeant Rodney Dawson worked with me at WPD and I see him as a lieutenant soon. He’s one who helped prepare me for this position,” Prince said.  Dawson was one of five sergeants who reported to Prince.
“It’s just like a former commander at Space Command once told me, ‘If you want your work day to go smoothly, teach the person under you what your job is and how you’d do it. Then carry on and let them do the job.’ Rodney was that exceptional person who worked for me,” Prince concluded.

Prince has ample opportunity to apply his leadership philosophy at Albert J. Ellis Airport. He directs and supervises a robust airport security and law enforcement program to include passenger screening per federal regulations, maintaining compliance with TSA regulations and planning and implementing a training program for airport police officers. These tasks coexist with supervising and patrolling the airport perimeter, access points, ramps and secure areas.  He will ensure law enforcement certifications are in accordance with state regulations and maintain all law enforcement records. The chief must supervise the fingerprinting program, criminal history record checks and issue security credentials for Albert J. Ellis.  Additionally, Prince will be the emergency point of contact for all federal agencies.

“I realize there is a lot of skill on the force with a majority having veteran law enforcement experience. They’re already well-trained and committed. The force is part of the community and has
a reputation for being professional, courteous and customer-oriented. I look forward to helping the force advance and together we’ll improve to as high a level as we can achieve.  I’m excited to work
with this team and in Onslow County,” Prince said.

Michael "Beach Mick" Hudson

About the Author:

Michael "Beach Mick" Hudson is the founder and Editor of Beach Carolina Magazine. Living along the coast of North Carolina, Mike has a passion for the beach and loves to bring news and events of the Carolinas to others around the world.

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