Carolina Bluegrass Exhibit, Performances, Programs & Jam Session at N.C. Museum of History

MUSEUM PRESENTS FREE BLUEGRASS EXHIBIT, PERFORMANCES AND MORE

RALEIGH, NC August 6, 2014 – The N.C. Museum of History is jumping on the bluegrass bandwagon with an exhibit, performances and programs to celebrate Raleigh’s second year of hosting the International Bluegrass Music Association’s annual conference and Wide Open Bluegrass festival.

Opening Friday, Aug. 29, the lobby exhibit Carolina Bluegrass: Breakdowns and Revivals will showcase a different instrument every five weeks. Each instrument was owned and played by a well-known bluegrass musician with ties to North Carolina.

Other parts of Carolina Bluegrass will focus on how bluegrass festivals and fiddlers’ conventions — along with record labels and television shows, such as “The Andy Griffith Show”and “The Beverly Hillbillies” — helped popularize bluegrass music between the early 1950s and the early 1980s.

This free exhibit in the museum lobby will run through May 17, 2015. It is sponsored in part by the Foundation for Bluegrass Music.

A breakdown of exhibit dates for each instrument follows.

Doc Watson at MerleFest in 2002. From Friday, Aug. 29, through Wednesday, Oct. 8, a guitar made by Charlotte luthier Carl McIntyre for Doc Watson will be featured in the exhibit Carolina Bluegrass: Breakdowns and Revivals. Image Credit: D. Kent Thompson Collection. Southern Folklife Collection. UNC-Chapel Hill.

Doc Watson at MerleFest in 2002. From Friday, Aug. 29, through Wednesday, Oct. 8, a guitar made by Charlotte luthier Carl McIntyre for Doc Watson will be featured in the exhibit Carolina Bluegrass: Breakdowns and Revivals. Image Credit: D. Kent Thompson Collection. Southern Folklife Collection. UNC-Chapel Hill.

Doc Watson

Friday, Aug. 29 through Wednesday, Oct. 8 

A guitar made by Charlotte luthier Carl McIntyre for Doc Watson, who played it at New York City’s Carnegie Hall in June 1992. The legendary flat-picking guitarist and folksinger won seven Grammy Awards. In 1988 he started the annual music festival MerleFest.

 

Rodney Dillard and Beverly Cotten-Dillard

Thursday, Oct. 9 through Wednesday, Nov. 12

The Martin D-28 guitar played by Rodney Dillard on “The Andy Griffith Show” as a member of the fictional Darling boys’ bluegrass band. The Dillards made six appearances on the CBS sitcom between 1963 and 1966.

A ca. 1981 custom-made Ome banjo that Dillard’s wife, Beverly Cotten-Dillard, played on “Hee Haw,” the Disney Channel, public television programs, and at festivals.

 

Bobby Hicks

Thursday, Nov. 13 through Wednesday, Dec. 17

The fiddle Bobby Hicks played during his years with Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys. A 10-time Grammy winner, Hicks is one of the most influential fiddlers in bluegrass music. He joined Ricky Skaggs’s band in 1981 and played fiddle and banjo with the Kentucky Thunder until 2004.

Arthur Smith

Thursday, Dec. 18 through Wednesday, Jan. 21

The Vega tenor banjo played by Arthur Smith while composing and later recording “Feudin’ Banjos” with Don Reno in 1955. Popularized as “Dueling Banjos” in the 1972 film Deliverance, it is one of the most famous movie melodies of all time.

Curly Seckler  

Thursday, Jan. 22 through Wednesday, March 4

A mandolin played by Curly Seckler during his time with Lester Flatt and the Nashville Grass. He is best known as the mandolin player and tenor singer for Flatt and Earl Scruggs’s Foggy Mountain Boys. Seckler’s signature “chop” rhythm technique influenced generations of mandolinists.

 

David Holt

Thursday, March 5 through Wednesday, April 8

A banjo played by four-time Grammy winner David Holt, a musician, storyteller, historian, and host of radio and television programs, such as “Folkways” on PBS and “Fire on the Mountain” on the Nashville Network. Holt now tours the country, performing solo and with his band, the Lightning Bolts.

Earl Scruggs

Thursday, April 9 through Sunday, May 17

An “Earl Scruggs” signature banjo, ca. 1984, that Scruggs helped design for Gibson Guitar Corp. Scruggs’s three-finger picking technique remains the standard in bluegrass music. He played banjo with Bill Monroe’s band, the Blue Grass Boys, until he and Lester Flatt formed the Foggy Mountain Boys. They were longtime members of the Grand Ole Opry and earned numerous awards and honors.

*FREE BLUEGRASS PERFORMANCES, PROGRAM AND JAM SESSION *

History à la Carte: North Carolina’s Bluegrass Tradition

Wednesday, Sept. 10, noon-1 p.m.

Bring your lunch; beverages provided.

Joe Newberry will intersperse this engaging talk with music. He is a North Carolina transplant who has created music most of his life — with a banjo, a guitar and a fiddle. His legendary songwriting and singing skills have delighted audiences around the world.

Enjoy listening to Carolina bluegrass with the duo Grits and Soul, featuring Anna Kline and John Looney, at the program Bluegrass in the Garden on Sunday, Sept. 14. Image credit: Courtesy of Grits and Soul.

Enjoy listening to Carolina bluegrass with the duo Grits and Soul, featuring Anna Kline and John Looney, at the program Bluegrass in the Garden on Sunday, Sept. 14. Image credit: Courtesy of Grits and Soul.

Bluegrass in the Garden

Sunday, Sept. 14, 4-6 p.m.

Enjoy listening to Carolina bluegrass with the duo Grits and Soul, featuring Anna Kline and John Looney. The event takes place in Fletcher Garden, outside the Museum of History. The program is sponsored by Sonic Pie Productions.

New Deal String Band

Wednesday, Oct. 1, 5-7 p.m.

Hear the original members of this Raleigh-based band as they reunite for a special concert. The New Deal String Band achieved national fame as one of the pioneers of “newgrass” — a progressive style of bluegrass.

PineCone Bluegrass Jam

Thursday, Oct. 2, 5-7 p.m.

Bring your instrument and your love of bluegrass to the Museum of History for a jam session; co-sponsored by PineCone, the Piedmont Council of Traditional Music.

For information about the N.C. Museum of History, a Smithsonian-affiliated museum, call 919-807-7900 or access www.ncmuseumofhistory.org or follow on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ or YouTube.

 

About the N.C. Museum of History

The N.C. Museum of History is located at 5 E. Edenton Street in downtown Raleigh. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. The museum collects and preserves artifacts of North Carolina history and educates the public on the history of the state and the nation through exhibits and educational programs. Each year more than 300,000 people visit the museum to see some of the 150,000 artifacts in the museum collection. The Museum of History, within the Division of State History Museums, is part of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

About the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources (NCDCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s cultural resources to build the social, cultural and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan W. Kluttz, NCDCR’s mission to enrich lives and communities creates opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history and libraries in North Carolina that will spark creativity, stimulate learning, preserve the state’s history and promote the creative economy. NCDCR was the first state organization in the nation to include all agencies for arts and culture under one umbrella.

Through arts efforts led by the N.C. Arts Council, the N.C. Symphony and the N.C. Museum of Art, NCDCR offers the opportunity for enriching arts education for young and old alike and economic stimulus engines for our state’s communities. NCDCR’s Divisions of Archives and Records, State Historic Sites, and State History Museums preserve, document and interpret North Carolina’s rich cultural heritage. NCDCR’s State Library of North Carolina is the principal library of state government and builds the capacity of all libraries in our state, developing and supporting access to traditional and online collections such as genealogy and resources for people who are blind and have physical disabilities.

NCDCR annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported symphony orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council and the State Archives of North Carolina. NCDCR champions our state’s creative industry that accounts for more than 300,000 jobs and generates nearly $18.5 billion in revenues. For more information, please call 919-807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

Michael "Beach Mick" Hudson

About the Author:

Michael "Beach Mick" Hudson is the founder and Editor of Beach Carolina Magazine. Living along the coast of North Carolina, Mike has a passion for the beach and loves to bring news and events of the Carolinas to others around the world.

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